Tuesday, January 28, 2020

The Decolonisation of Africa 1959-1964 Essay Example for Free

The Decolonisation of Africa 1959-1964 Essay To what extent was Britain able to retain control over decolonisation in Africa between 1959 and 1964? By 1959 decolonisation in British Africa was well under way, for example, the Gold Coast in West Africa had become independent in 1957, Nigeria and Sierra Leone were well on their way to independence, and agitation and advances towards independence were already taking place in Kenya and Tanganyika in Eastern Africa. By 1964 this had spread throughout Britain’s African territories and many more had either become independent or started their journey and development towards independence, as the â€Å"political face of the continent was transformed†[1]. This essay will examine what it was that led to this huge change in policy towards Africa, from a time at the beginning of the 1950s when no one expected any of Britain’s colonies to become independent within a generation, let alone within a decade, to a time in the mid-1960s when Britain’s colonial possessions in Africa were severely dwindling and there was a clear line of policy towards decolonisation there. Even in 1959, as Hemming recognises, â€Å"a conference of East African governors agreed that the likely timetable of independence would be: Tanganyika in 1970, Kenya in 1975 and Uganda somewhere between the two†[2]. In fact Tanganyika gained independence in 1961, Kenya in 1963 and Uganda in 1962. As Hemming identifies, â€Å"a fifteen year timetable had been reduced by 80 percent†[3]. This essay will look at such questions as: How can we judge if Britain was in control? ; Was Britain in control of the pace, or the actual process of events of how independence came about? ; Was Britain in control of who to transfer power to? This essay will attempt to answer these questions by examining all of the various problems, and pressures with which Britain was faced regarding its African colonies, which can been seen to have taken the control of decolonisation in Africa between 1959 and 1964 out of Britain’s hands. It will look at whether Britain really wanted to maintain control of its colonial territories, or whether, once Britain had decided not to keep its colonies, it actually did not want to remain in control of decolonisation in Africa. In some cases did it actually make it easier for Britain to allow control of African decolonisation **** out of its hands. This essay will examine whether it is certain that once the ‘wind of change’ of African nationalism began spreading through Africa, that Britain was not entirely in control, and, will examine the extent to which Britain did retain control, if it did at all. It will look at the pressures the British government had to deal with, for example, pressures from the UN to end British imperialism, pressures from the US, and pressures from other members of the Commonwealth, as well as from the rest of Europe. It will examine the strength of colonial nationalism and the extent to which this took the control of decolonisation in Africa away from Britain, or at least forced the British government to change and adapt its policy in order to cope and deal with this threat. This essay will look at pressures at home in Britain, from members of the government and those in opposition as well as British public opinion, and the extent to which this affected Britain’s policy over decolonisation. It will also look at the impact and influence that the process of decolonisation being pursued by other European imperial powers in Africa had on Britain’s decolonisation policy. It will look at how much the desire of Britain to maintain its role as a world power, and maintain, for example, the special relationship with America, and its position in the Commonwealth, had on British policy over decolonisation and whether this desire led to Britain pursuing a policy direction which it otherwise would not have done. Finally, having examined all these pressures and events which affected Britain’s decolonisation policy in Africa, this essay will attempt to examine to what extent Britain was, or was not, able to retain control over this process, and affect it in a way which was acceptable to Britain. It will then try and make an assessment, whether or not Britain did retain control over decolonisation in Africa in the period from 1959 to 1964, and, if Britain was in control, the extent of this control.

Monday, January 20, 2020

Environmental Essay -- Biodiversity, Ecological Systems

Biodiversity is the makeup and interconnectedness of ecological systems. Biodiversity makes up all the diversity among living things within a specific system. This diversity of life is invaluable to human existence for countless reasons; it is a primary source for environmental resources that shape the economics of a region, it provides the scientific community with what seems to be an ever-growing source of data that can be used for things like medicine, and provides food and aesthetic value to human life. Ontario is a privileged province of Canada as it contains over 25,00 different species of plants and animals. (†¨Lemieux, Scott. 2011) With such a vast collection of biodiversity Ontario has the obligation to ensure its protection and growth of the thousands of years of evolution that lead to the complex array of life it now contains. With the growth of the human population biodiversity is shrinking, as the globe becomes one species orientated the externalities of human exist ence threaten biodiversity. One example of these externalities are the impacts anthropogenic climate change, the changing climate due to human activities threatens wildlife as it changes their habitats at rates that most wildlife cannot adopt and evolve to live in. (Lemieux, Scott 2011). Considering the excess of 25,000 different species in Ontario, the province has a large obligation to protect and maintain this biodiversity from the dangers that human existence pose to it. The federal and provincial governments have created many laws and regulations that relate to the protection and management of the environment and biodiversity. More specifically the provincial government of Ontario has the Endangered species act, which will be the focal point of analys... ...he environment and biodiversity by protecting species at risk of extinction and their habitats. After analysis and discussion it is clearly evident that the statue was a positive movement towards a better-managed environment but has many areas of concern. The act deals with problems in a reactive nature when it should be a proactive one in maintaining biodiversity. Secondly it comes into conflict when the species concerned overlaps with private property and unjustly puts the social cost of helping the species to the hands of the private landowners, better management between landowner and government polices should be made to fix the conflicts which arise from this. Finally the act needs to deal with the scope of biodiversity being centered around a one species orientated nature, and by this should focus a better management of human interaction with the environment.

Sunday, January 12, 2020

True Grit

Ronnie Simonson Mrs. Brown W-2 2-26-11 The Analysis of Baseball A very famous author and poet May Swenson, wrote a poem called the,† The Analysis of Baseball†. This Poem uses many types of poetry elements. The elements that are primarily used in, â€Å"The Analysis of Baseball† are Onamonpias, Rhyme, and metaphors. In the Poem,†The Analysis of Baseball† there are many Onamonpias used as an element of poetry. In this poem Onamonpias are used to get the reader into the poem and give excitement.The first example where an Onamonpia is used is when May Swenson says, â€Å"Ball bounces off bat, flies air, or thwack ball meets mitt. What that statement was saying was that the batter can choose whether to make contact with the ball or watch as it goes into the catcher’s mitt. One more example where an Onamonpia is used to give excitement to the poem is where she says, â€Å"Sometimes ball gets hit Pow when bat meets it, and sails to a place where mitt just has to quit. In that example the word POW is the sound that is going to occur when the ball meets the bat. Next in the poem, â€Å"The Analysis of Baseball† rhyme is another element of poetry used in this poem. In this poem rhyme is used because it gives it a scene of humor and helps the reader get a rhythm. The first example where rhyme is used is when the poet says, â€Å"Ball hates to take bat’s bait. † What that is saying is that the ball doses not want to come into a coalition with the bat or have a big impact.The next example of rhyme that is used stated is,† Ball flirts, bats late, don’t keep the date. † What that meant was that the batter was late to swing and now cannot hit the ball. The last main element of poetry that was used in, â€Å"The Analysis of Baseball† is Metaphors. One example of a metaphor is when May Swenson says, â€Å"Bat waits for ball to mate. Ball hates to take bats bait. † In that verse May Swen son is saying that the batter has swung and missed the ball and now has a strike because the bat wants to mate but the ball does not want to take bats bait.The next example where a metaphor is used is when she says, â€Å"Ball flirts, bats late, don’t keep the date. † What that statement was saying is the batter has once again swung and missed and now has an additional strike. This poem has used many types of elements of poetry. May Swenson used metaphors, rhyme, and Onamonpias to give this poem excitement and also help give the reader meaning to the poem. This poem also tells the reader what is happening without really even telling them what is happening. True Grit Ronnie Simonson Mrs. Brown W-2 2-26-11 The Analysis of Baseball A very famous author and poet May Swenson, wrote a poem called the,† The Analysis of Baseball†. This Poem uses many types of poetry elements. The elements that are primarily used in, â€Å"The Analysis of Baseball† are Onamonpias, Rhyme, and metaphors. In the Poem,†The Analysis of Baseball† there are many Onamonpias used as an element of poetry. In this poem Onamonpias are used to get the reader into the poem and give excitement.The first example where an Onamonpia is used is when May Swenson says, â€Å"Ball bounces off bat, flies air, or thwack ball meets mitt. What that statement was saying was that the batter can choose whether to make contact with the ball or watch as it goes into the catcher’s mitt. One more example where an Onamonpia is used to give excitement to the poem is where she says, â€Å"Sometimes ball gets hit Pow when bat meets it, and sails to a place where mitt just has to quit. In that example the word POW is the sound that is going to occur when the ball meets the bat. Next in the poem, â€Å"The Analysis of Baseball† rhyme is another element of poetry used in this poem. In this poem rhyme is used because it gives it a scene of humor and helps the reader get a rhythm. The first example where rhyme is used is when the poet says, â€Å"Ball hates to take bat’s bait. † What that is saying is that the ball doses not want to come into a coalition with the bat or have a big impact.The next example of rhyme that is used stated is,† Ball flirts, bats late, don’t keep the date. † What that meant was that the batter was late to swing and now cannot hit the ball. The last main element of poetry that was used in, â€Å"The Analysis of Baseball† is Metaphors. One example of a metaphor is when May Swenson says, â€Å"Bat waits for ball to mate. Ball hates to take bats bait. † In that verse May Swen son is saying that the batter has swung and missed the ball and now has a strike because the bat wants to mate but the ball does not want to take bats bait.The next example where a metaphor is used is when she says, â€Å"Ball flirts, bats late, don’t keep the date. † What that statement was saying is the batter has once again swung and missed and now has an additional strike. This poem has used many types of elements of poetry. May Swenson used metaphors, rhyme, and Onamonpias to give this poem excitement and also help give the reader meaning to the poem. This poem also tells the reader what is happening without really even telling them what is happening.

Saturday, January 4, 2020

Lesson Plan Survey Data and Graphing

Students will use a survey to collect and then represent data in a picture graph(link) and a bar graph(link). Class: 3rd grade Duration: 45 minutes each on two class days Materials notebook paperpencil If working with students who need some visual assistance, you may wish to use actual graph paper rather than notebook paper. Key Vocabulary: survey, bar graph, picture graph, horizontal, vertical Objectives: Students will use a survey to collect data. Students will choose their scale and create a picture graph and bar graph to represent their data. Standards Met: 3.MD.3. Draw a scaled picture graph and a scaled bar graph to represent a data set with several categories. Lesson Introduction: Open up a discussion with the class about favorites. What is your favorite ice cream flavor? Topping? Syrup? What is your favorite fruit? Your favorite vegetable? Your favorite school subject? Book? In most third grade classrooms, this is a sure-fire way to get kids excited and sharing their opinions. If doing a survey and graphing for the first time, it might be helpful to choose one of these favorites and do a quick survey of your students so that you have data to a model in the steps below. Step-by-Step Procedure Students design a survey. Give your survey participants no more than 5 choices to pick from. Make predictions about the survey results.Conduct the survey. There are many things that you can do to set your students up for success here. A free-for-all survey will result in poor results and a headache for the teacher! My suggestion would be to set expectations early in the lesson and also model the correct behavior for your students.Total the results of the survey. Prepare for the next part of the lesson by having students find the range of responses - the category with the least number of people who selected that item as their favorite, and the category with the most.Set up the graph. Have students draw their horizontal axis and then the vertical axis. Ask students to write their categories (fruit choices, pizza toppings, etc.) below the horizontal axis. Make sure these categories are well-spaced so that their graph will be easily read.Now is the time to talk to students about the numb ers that will go on the vertical axis. If they surveyed 20 people, they will either need to number from 1-20 or create hash marks for every two people, for every five people, etc. Model this thought process with a graph of your own so that students can make this decision.Have students complete their picture graph first. Brainstorm with students what pictures could represent their data. If they have surveyed others about ice cream flavors, they can draw one ice cream cone to represent one person (or two people, or five people, depending on what scale they have chosen in Step 4.). If surveying people about their favorite fruits, they could choose an apple to represent the number of people choosing apples, a banana for those who chose bananas, etc.When the picture graph is finished, students will have an easier time constructing their bar graph. They have already designed their scale and know how far up the vertical axis each category should go. All they need to do now is draw the bars for each category. Homework/Assessment: Over the course of the next week, have students ask friends, family, neighbors (remembering safety issues here) to respond to their initial survey. Adding this data in with the classroom data, have them create an additional bar and picture graph. Evaluation: After students have added their family and friends data to their initial survey data, use the results of the completed survey and their final graphs to evaluate their understanding of the lesson objectives. Some students may merely struggle with creating an appropriate scale for their vertical axis, and these students could be placed in a small group for some practice in this skill. Others may have trouble with representing their data in both types of graphs. If a considerable number of students fall into this category, plan to reteach this lesson in a few weeks. Students love surveying others, and this is an excellent way to review and practice their graphing skills.